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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 109 (some duplicates have been removed)
christy is wrong, i do not have to tell him that, because the science tells him that. >> there was a poll, saying that parents think in video games contributes to a culture of violence. 89% of parents polled, point the finger of violence to tv and movies. what do you say to the parents every day, everything americans that are saying that as a parent, they look at it and feel that way that these violent video games add something to the culture of youth they are raising? >> well, first of all, i support the rights of any parent to not buy any product that they do not want to buy for their children. and that is why the video game industry has spent a long time cataloging and creating ratings systems and labeling descriptions on every game that is sold in the stores so they know what is it in so they do not have to buy it for their children. the science points to something different that the science shows that and this is confirmed by the surgeon general and by the supreme court that video games are not posing danger for adults or children. >> when we look at 2008, the stats, game makers have
.com. i don't know if it is a science or running the data. whatever it is, i want to talk about it. i had no idea you were bringing this in. >> it is the real thing. they rarely go up for sale. only oscars made before 1950 can be bought and sold. this is from 1946. it is anna and the king of siam, best set decoration. it was up for best picture and wind on to inspire "the king and i." >> why would anyone want to sell the oscar? >> in this case, it was the grandson. his grandfather had won several and he wanted to dispose of one of them. bill murray, i was very upset there was no mention of bill murray. >> it is delightful. >> he is amazing. am i out of it. did i expect he was going to be nominated? >> a lot of jaw-dropping a-listers. there was no. there were a lot more stars like quvenzhane. she is the best star. >> i asked, was this a big deal for you. was it ever? >> i asked her, do you have your acceptance speech ready for the oscars. she said, i'm still working on it. >> did she really say that, nine years old. she is going to be a big hit. >>> apart from the snubs, no real surprise t
is the continued united states pre-eminence, not just in demand space programs but in terms of science and inventions and everything else that goes along with it, and it ended up being washed away in the flood of stimulus france. as this hearing has highlighted already, the president's approach to human spaceflight lacks a clear mission and he is relying on the success of commercial space, which i agreed is vital that has dragged its feet and pushed its flight at nasa. i strongly support a public-private partnership for the country's space policy. however, it is up to nasa to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector doesn't have enough funds to do it by itself, and that heavy lift rocket needs enough thrust to overcome the administration shortsightedness. now why cancel inhofe, the international partners who supported the mission, president obama has taken a been there and done that approach but we haven't been there for 40 years and the international partners who would have helped us have never been there. if we cannot lead the world with space, china and russia will i
of a classroom or a building? >> it was inside of the science building, but i don't know if it was in a classroom or a hall way. i don't have that information. >> was it mid-class? >> i don't know. it was sometime this morning. i'm not sure what time it was this morning or if they were in a classroom or a hall way between classes. i don't know. >> just to confirm, one victim, the one student injured, airlifted to a hospital. one single injury? >> that's the information that we have at this point, yes. >> i know this is very, very early, but any connection between the student who was shot and the student shooter? >> we don't have information on that at this point. >> final question of other schools in the area on lockdown? what's the status? >> that i don't know. i don't know if we lockdown the other schools in the taft area or not. >> ray pruitt from the kern county sheriff's department. we thank you so much for calling in. give us a call back if you hear anything else. that is new information we got from this school shooting. the fact that the shooter was a student and used a shotgun. this happe
colbert's mind last night. now neil, one of the most popular science writers of our time takes us for a wild ride through the universe here on "the cycle." >> you have said i'm related to a fish, right? >> oh, yeah. the challenge here is taking it to rocks and planets and stellar processes and the big bang. itsd the unity of all physical entities in the world. >> can you get me $5 worth of whatever it is? sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unu
think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. i have not seen a program with that bill 10. people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rather than just jobs today an
in science and technology. and we're investing much less than we used to in core areas of education. state universities for example are being decimated. so if you don't invest for the future, where are you going to get the growth in the future? >> but in 2008 and 2009, invest became a bad word, invest became government spending. when you're talking about investing, you're talking about it in a fairly sophisticated manner. some in the government. some the private sector, each on their own and some jointly. that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't get something like a basic budget done. >> the problem is we're going to have to do some of this, anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you defer maintenance, if you say to yourself, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's actually a penny wise, pound-foolish decision. it will eventually break and cost you three times as much. that's what's happening with our roads, bridges and highways. if you look at air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated travel systems, we
, celeste ward gventer, thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
, celeste ward gventer thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
is junk science? >> it is and very harmful. it tells us 5 million people will die every year because of global warming. they fail to say it has nothing to do with global warming. just the 3 million people was from indoor air pollution. if anything it is the opposite. lots of poor people in the third world burn cardboard or dong and they die from burning fat inside their houses. maybe give them cleaner fuels our fossil fuels there will be better. they tell us the wrong story and the wrong solution. john: the particulates kill people. global warming is theoretical. >> they say cut carbon emissions to help people dying from air pollution. no. don't burn down inside your house. we don't think of it because it was 100 years ago we had dirty fuels. john: in the west. but they pander to talk about the big storms caused by global warming. here is out for. >> this storm was related to global warming. the second ones in 100 years storm within 14 months. john: 2012 was below average the hurricanes go up and down. >> globally with hurricane energy index the lowest since the late 1970's. it is pa
to in infrastructure. we're investing half as much in science and technology. and we're investing much less than we used to in core areas of education -- state universities, for example, are being decima decimated. if you don't invest for the future, where are you going to get the growth? >> but in 2008 and 2009, invest became a bad word. it became government spending. when you're talking about investing, you're talking about a sophisticated manner. some government, some private sector, some on their own and some jointly. >> precisely. >> that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't even get a budget done. >> and the problem is we're going to have to do some of this anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you differ maintenance, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's penny-wise but pound pool foolish. the whole thing will break and cost you three times the amount. air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated air traffic systems. we need to update the computers. it's $25 billion. we're not spending that money because as
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: as unemployment, growth and budget concerns continue, the man who will lead president obama's new economic team was formally nominated today. the announcement came this afternoon, the latest in a series of major cabinet changes. >> one reason jack has been so effective in this town is because he is a low-key guy who prefers to surround himself with policy experts rather than t.v. cameras. >> brown: with that, the president introduced his nominee to be the next secretary of the treasury, jack lew, the man he made his chief of staff, a year ago yesterday. lew would succeed tim geithner, who drew fulsome praise from the president. >> when the history books are written tim geithner's going to go down as one o
with a shotgun in a science classroom, wounding one student and leaving three others with minor injuries. another school shooting doesn't change the difficult politics of this issue. though biden's meeting came with a photo op. >> as an owner of shotguns, as a guy, i'm no great hunter, mostly skeet shooting for me. >> both the nra meeting and an evening meeting with the entertainment representatives pictured here were closed. during his movie, "django unchained" quentin tarantino with movies like "pulp fiction" refused to answer the question about the possibility of violent images. >> the vice president is talking to the people in the movie industry today about violence. >> and you know where i stand on it. >> which is that there is no relationship. >> yes. >> but you haven't said why you think there is no relationship. >> it's none of your damn business what i think about that. >> there you go. an arraignment hearing for james holmes, the shooter who killed 12 people and injured dozens more at a movie theatre in aurora, collapsed summer and claimed to be inspired by "batman's" joker is scheduled
is a big deal. getting the kids in school today studying the sciences and technology and engineering and the math to stay in this country and getting a path to his citizenship and dealing with the competencies' to grow jobs. if you can deal with those issues, we would be off to a great start. >> you have many of your clients in the manufacturing business. looking at the broader economic shift, what do you do in a post- manufacturing world to provide the numbers of jobs that america needs? because it does not appear clear yet. >> we have roughly 12 million jobs through the great recession lost. we have filled about half of those. it will still take some more between five-seven years to get unemployment down to the 5% range. and you are right, the skill sets are starting to move. it will have to be able to move with that prepared the first that -- we will have to be able to move with that. the first up is immigration reform and job training. >> you are a guide in ohio and you have lost your job at a car plant and you are 55 years old. immigration reform will not help you much, is it? >
it happened in the science building. the suspect apparently entered with a shotgun and shot another stunt. that student was flown, med-evacked to bakersfield 25, miles away to a hospital. no word on the injuries there was a second injured person as well, a teacher. no idea what the injuries were. the teacher refuse treatment on scene, maybe because there were grazed or a scuffle. the good news is that the suspect is in custody, and the student who was shot has been taken to a hospital where they're being treated at this hour. >> shepard: interestingly, some of the first reporting came from kids on their phones. reporter: yeah. in fact we got them, too. we jumped on to twitter and right away there were tweets coming from students at the high school -- at least we believe they were students at the high school -- local media said that's were getting phone calls from students, students were alerting each other via text messages, tweets, some were hiding in closets, some went to the football field. and you can see from the pictures, students got out and away from the science building because t
cars hurt the environment. science to push their agenda. .e choosing advil® because helps you keep doing what you love. no wonder it's america's #1 selling pain reliever. you took action, you took advil®. and we thank you. with hand-layered pasta, tomatoes, and real mozzarella cheese. but what makes us even prouder... is what our real dinners can do for your family. stouffer's. let's fix dinner. >>eric: extreme weather in jerusalem. the holy land getting a rare snowstorm that paralyzed the city. eight inches piling up on palm trees and streets. it's been over a decade since the last snowfall in the city. michael j. fox is ready for a comeback. he says his parkinson's is under control and he'll be returning to a new tv show where he plays a character who has parkinson's. >>alisyn: some people believe their environmental plans are scientifically sound but are they ignoring evidence when it does not back up their agenda? hank campbell is the founder of science 2.0 and cofounder of science left behind, feel-good fallacies in the rise of the anti-scientific left. let's talk about suppo
to have an absolute number. this is still relatively emerging science. a couple years ago, we weren't hardly talking about this. we do seem to know that the more hits to the head, the worse, which would make sense. the earlier they start, the worse it is. i saw evidence of this in a person who was 17 years old, carol. it can be quite significant. you see again the impact of those hits to the head, the swelling, the inflammation that can sometimes occur in the brain. a setup to the cte. >> so i'm going to ask you a question maybe you don't know the answer to. the nfl, it says it is addressing this problem. is it addressing it effectively? >> it is hard to say. i think there has been some rule changes now to take away some of the most dangerous parts of the game. i think they have focused a lot on concussions specifically. if someone has a concussion, they are more likely to stay out of the game and get a sideline game. >> you are a football fan. you watch these sub con sus sieve hits. the guy bounces back up, seemingly no problems. it is those things, accumulating over time, that pro
came to science class in the middle of first period, aimed a shotgun at a fellow student and pulled the trigger. he didn't stop there. >> he didn't try to engage a second student that he named and tried to shoot him and missed. the teacher at that point was trying to get the students out of the classroom and engaged the shooter who had numerous rounds of shotgun shells in a 12 gauge shotgun. numerous rounds in his pocket. he engaged the suspect with in conversation. a campus supervisor showed up, was outside the classroom and together they engaged in conversation with this young man and at one point he put the shotgun down and police officers were able to take him into custody. >> shepard: that, they say, may have saved the day. still, two targets, one hit and one missed. the sheriff says the gunman had as many as 20 rounds in his pockets when they arrested him. now we are getting some clues as to why he may have done. this the sheriff says the suspect and the victim had some sort of dialogue this morning. but he could not confirm reports the suspect had been bullied or that he was
. i'm going to bring in now jason johnson to talk about this. he is a professor of political science and the chief political correspondent at politic365. let's start with chuck hagel because he's republican, bipartisanship we thought about here, kumbaya moment. not working out so well. >> there's no kumbaya moments in washington, d.c. republicans are still bitter. a lot of them don't like that chuck hagel has been so close to president obama for a long time. i think this is a bunch of sort of chest beating right now. i think hagel will get through. obama might have to fight for it but i think he gets through. >> you don't think it will be a squeaker. some say he may not get the nod. >> there are a lot of republican who is will come out and say we have a with him, we have to vet him, but many believe the constitutionality of the president being able to select the cabinet. a lot of republicans feel in the end we'll let him through. the president should be able to this have his cabinet. we'll argue policy later. >> the problems that republicans seem to have is comments he's made in refe
the nra was able to whip up their members in a frenzy. this is a classic political science case study of an interest group that is very intense and cares almost about this thing alone. on the top list of concerns, guns are one through ten, against a public that cares about this and a lot of other things and whose attention may wax and wane depending what else is going on in their lives. they are very intense, they have a lot of money, and it's a good sign that liberal groups and groups like the mayors that bloomberg is supporting -- >> mayors against guns. >> are getting out there and trying to get their foot into the debate politically with donations but also this changing the dynamics because this can't go forward and succeed unless there's a strong coalition including police and citizens and public health advocates fighting as hard as the nra fights. >> eric holder, the attorney general, met with retailers including the nation's largest seller of firearms, walmart, and some 250,000 survivors of gun violence have sent a letter with protests planned on tuesday to move them to stop se
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guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> since the election, vice president has taken a front and center role leading the task force and as he points out in his new column, his success might be partly attributable to the fact that republican ares like biden and feels he treats them fairly. does anyone know how to make a deal. it was a rethor are ical question. first he will have to beat hillary clinton. in a new ppp poll, 57% said they would like to see her as the democratic presidential candidate. joining me now. msnbc ezra's klein. >> the joe by den that we have seen emerged is the one we know. i have seen him be concise, effective. very clear, on what objectives are and clear on what was possible and that seems to be the role he is playing inside the white house. it is a big role. it was born out of the increasing feel of biden. he makes these hilarious jokes. telling people they are going to have to spread their legs to get frisked at the senate. when he ran with president obama the
is a great company, we've been this business for 32 years. we have tremendous science based products that are high in health and safety and a tremendous business opportunity. we're proud of where we are today and confident about our future. >> after the herbalife meeting ends, michael john so thson wil appear on skauk squawk on the treat. must see tv. this story has legs. >> as an investment story, i can make an argument that perhaps we're overdoing it a bit. but as a story, come on. the fact as of yesterday this new plot twist with dan taking on where he thought his friend, referring to him only, though, as the short seller. i thought that was a little hostile in his letter. just adds another layer of intrigue. and significant money at stake for both hedge funds. >> and herb greenberg has been on this for a very long time. michael johnson has come on my show at mod money. but he has a documentary that's fascinating. in terms of timely, i've never seen anything like it. >> it has been in the works for months. so check it out if you haven't already. called selling the dream. but in te
? >> what greg has just described is what when i went to graduate school in political science 40 years ago, that's how america makes policy p, it's called incrementalism. look at this deal at the end of last year which absolutely nobody loves and it's the farthest thing from a grand bargain, on the other hand, it takes a few billion dollars out of long-term debt. it's not enough. we'll come up with some other deals and it's nonsense for the president spokesman to say he's not going to compromise. that doesn't mean anything. we're going to see more of this bit and pieces. as you both said, the market and business continue to move along, look for ways to look money, look for opportunities and i think that's going to continue to be the story. don't wait for clarity. act on where there's money to be made now. >> i like, greg, what you wrote in an article for "the economist" recently. markets now live in the policy equivalent of beirut in 1982. what did you mean by that? >> what i'm trying to say is essentially we have the fiscal equivalent of civil war going on all of the time here in washingt
to go to that is on the far side of the moon that can be the robotic science can do the mining for the ice crystals and convert that into hydrogen and oxygen which is fuel the conference recently as following a workshop that has been sent out in the international learning basis by practicing on the island of hawaii to assemble a large number of large objects. you put the first one down and where are they expected? another one down at some distance away how do you put them together? if it's on hawaii, you do that through a satellite back to the mission control. so you prove that you can do something like that here in the united states. then we do it at the moon. why am i so enthusiastic about that? because that's exactly what we want to do at mars. we want to put people on the moon of mars who can then assemble the base we will then send people and we should assure ourselves we should protect crew members from radiation as much as possible before they ever go somewhere and that's the moon, too. >> kevin has a two-part question and i should ask the second part first. do you belie
for information and open science good, i don't see how this can be harmful. when we tell north koreans -- i've been dealing with them for years, what they are doing is heading toward a path toward confrontation against their own interests. against their own economic growth by spending so much on nuclear weapons, on missile tests, that's the message that they receive, and maybe we'll do some good, maybe not. and then there is the american there. >> you didn't get a chance to meet with kenneth bay. his son had written a letter, that he was hopeful you would deliver to his father. what happened on that front? >> the letter will be delivered. kenneth bay is way up in the northern part of the country. not accessible to us. but we made the point very strongly that he should be treated properly. we were assured that the judicial proceedings on his case would happen soon. that's sometimes a good sign, because it means it may be wrapping up and hopefully he'll be released. nobody had been -- we have a swedish representative there. we don't have representatives in north korea, advocating for him. thi
he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ound shipping at fedex office. >> good morning, "varney & company" viewers, today is thursday, january the 10th. the big story of the day is guns, and just how the president will deal with the very strong calls for action. the public wants something done. how will the president get it done? joe biden brings in the n.r.a., hollywood and wal-mart and many others with a stake in the gun debate. the headline out of these talks so far, president obama may take executive action, and step around congress and avoid the legislative process. but the the action isn't all just in d.c. the gun control debate is a national issue. just last night new york's governor cuomo call
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 109 (some duplicates have been removed)